pafa.net Rotating Header Image

SALS 10 Mobile Things Wrapup

being a newbieOne of the major projects I worked on over the past year was the SALS Ten Mobile Things project that concluded in June. This was part of a Digital Literacy project run by Jill Ryder, Jennifer Ferriss and Sara Dallas at the Southern Adirondack Library System.

It was modeled on 23MobileThings project originally developed by Jan Holmquist for the Guldborgsund Bibliotekern in Denmark. That project was translated into English by Jan, Kathryn Barwick and Mylee Joseph (both  from the State Library of New South Wales, Australia).  Like Helene Blowers’ original 23Things project, this mobile project is being translated into multiple languages and spreading like wildfire. There’s no doubt that the time was right for this!

For our project, we focused on many  of the same topics, but condensed them into 10 topics (more…)

NYS Summer Reading – YA Books Widget

One of the many fun projects that I have the privilege of working on is the New York State Summer Reading program website. We’ve been working on some redesigning, which is always a work in progress, and also lots of updates for this summer (not done yet)

I was checking stats today to see what pages were getting hits and was pleased to see the Teen Booklists (boring name I know) was the top hit getter. teenreads

Since I’m in no way an expert on YA titles, I wanted an easy way to add titles that appear on the many booklists available from different sources.  But also wanted something that had some graphic appeal. Since it’s a statewide site, I couldn’t pull a list of covers from a library catalog and link directly back to the titles.

Enter LibraryThing. I added titles from lots of different lists and used their widget building tool to create a widget that randomly displays 15 titles at a time.   There’s also a YouTube playlist of book trailers (again, that needs updating)

It’s easy enough to build your own widget, but if you want to use ours, here’s the code you can use to embed it on your own website.

<div id="w3ea6ee67fbfdc058028747e08628acc8"></div><script 
type="text/javascript" charset="UTF-8" 
src="http://www.librarything.com/widget_get.php? 
userid=summerreadingnys&theID=w3ea6ee67fbfdc058028747e08628acc8"></script> 
<noscript><a 
href="http://www.librarything.com/profile/summerreadingnys">My Library</a> 
at <a href="http://www.librarything.com">LibraryThing</a></noscript>

If you have suggestions for the booklist or the booktrailers widgets, let me know.   Maybe I’ll spend my summer vacation reading YA lit? What do you suggest?

Google Open Gallery

I’d forgotten that several months ago I’d requested an invite to test Google’s Open Gallery service. It’s the software that powers Google’s Art Project,  Historic Moments and World Wonders projects.  As of December 2013 it is being made available to anyone, though you do still have to apply for an invitation.

pollyalida

Test gallery with Google Custom Gallery

The software lets you build a collection of images and add text descriptions and metadata.  Your collections are displayed on a website with your own culturalspot.org URL or a custom URL. Individual items can be gathered into exhibits of related materials. Akin to software like ContendDM and Omeka. (I have no experience with these tools, so can’t compare features.)

The service is quite simple to use and I had a small test collection and an exhibit up and running in about 15 minutes. It’s the pollyalida collection of flowers – of course!

To really get a sense of what you can do with this, take a look at these collections.

What an easy way to get a small collection of historic photos, archival materials, art images and more online quickly and easily. And free.

 

Workshops in Connecticut – May 2014

There’s still space available in the following workshops in CT later this month:

 

Mobile Apps & Public Libraries

Earlier today I asked the library twitterverse for examples of mobile apps related workshops, classes, hangouts, meetups, etc that they’re offering to their communities. Some great examples were shared! I’ll add more if I get any more responses later.

My Tweet:

 

 Responses: 
 

 

 


 


 


 

 

Jauntful: Create your own travel guides

Jauntful is a great new tool for creating and sharing your own personalized travel guides. Create a guide to share your favorite places with friends. Create one for an upcoming trip with spots you don’t want to miss. Create a guide to your local area and share your favorite haunts.

Libraries could create a guide to the local community or a treasure hunt map for a fun summer event.

Students could use this to create a tour of an ancient or modern (or both) city for a school project. Or map out locations in a book, similar to a Google LitTrip.

Guides can be shared privately or with the world. Full color PDF versions for printing or taking with your offline.

Here’s my map of some favorite spots in Helsinki.